Recently I came across Barlow's Manifesto which was written by John Perry Barlow. 

The manifesto was written as a direct criticism of the Communications Decency Act in 1996. Barlow and others saw this act as a threat to the "independence and sovereignty of cyberspace". 

I find it a fascinating read as this was a time when the Internet was barely visible to most of society, yet John Barlow, (who was also a lyricist for the Grateful Dead), could see that any level of governance could have huge ramifications on the growth and scope of "the net". Barlow was clearly an early visionary of what cyberspace would become, and it's interesting how much of what he said back in 1996 is still relevant today.

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If you ever fancied learning how to program, why not take a look over at Channel 9 where there is a series of "how to" videos dedicated to doing just this.

Most of the videos are by Bob Tabor from LearnVisualStudio.net which generally is a paid for resource, but Microsoft have obviously seen the value and quality of his training and have obviously sponsored him to create content for the Channel 9 website.

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The new releases continue to flow! According to http://www.itpro.co.uk/643489/microsoft-releases-office-2013-to-manufacturers Office 2013 has now been released to manufacturers, which means general availability should be sometime in Spring.

No news yet for Technet, MSDN and MAPs subscribers.

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Microsoft have finally released Microsoft server 2012 essentials, the spiritual heir to Windows Home Server, (WHS), according to http://redmondmag.com/articles/2012/10/09/essentials-released-to-manufacturers.aspx.

I will be heading over to TechNet shortly to download my copy to evaluate on my HP N40L mini server.

Although this is the direct replacement for WHS, it is likely that most WHS 2011 users won't move across, simply because of the associated cost of a server operating system. Previous versions of WHS, were hugely discounted because of the intended home market. However, this product is primarily intended for small and medium-sized businesses, although it does have most of the functionality of the previous WHS product, but unfortunately not the cost…There is little doubt it will succeed in its intended market, but whether the average home user will upgrade remains to be seen.

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The Joomla! project has released version 3.0.1 which is a security release for the newly released Joomla! 3. As there was a small error in the update code, you will need to install a patch before doing the update to Joomla! 3.0.1. There are more details available at http://www.joomla.org/announcements/release-news/5468-joomla-3-0-1-released.html.

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Joomla 3 has been released!

This is the latest version of my favourite Content Management System, and promises a whole raft of new features as detailed at http://www.joomla.org/3/

The general recommendation seems to be that if you have an existing Joomla 2.5 site that is working, stick with it. However, if you want to create a new site without a great need for extensions, then it's probably worth a look.

At the moment there aren't many extensions available, but this will definitely change as time moves on.

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Having run my my main home PC as a Windows Server 2008 R2 machine for a while, primarily so that I could make use of it's Hyper-V capabilities to run various other OS's; I was really pleased to see that Windows 8 was going to have Hyper-V built in.

However, having nuked the installation, (yes I have an image saved away should I want to go back!), and installed Win 8 I was surprised to find out I can't in fact run Hyper-V because my processor lacks SLAT.

Apparently SLAT is "Second Level Address Translation", and is only supported in Intel's Core i3, i5 and i7 processors, and guess what I don't have!

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Have been released!

Why is this of any consequence to anyone? Because they are both very cool products, and I am the UK technical manager…!

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One thing that can make a huge difference to the look and feel of a website are the fonts used within the site. It's very easy to get locked into the idea that you should restrict yourself to the "web safe fonts" such as those defined at W3 schools.

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